TPP

The P4, formally the "Trans-Pacific Strategic Economic Partnership Agreement", is a so-called free trade agreement betweeen the four Pacific governments of Brunei Darussalam, Chile, New Zealand and Singapore. It was previously dubbed the P3 until Brunei was incorporated into the negotiating process. It was signed on 3 June 2005 and came into force on 1 January 2006.

In September 2008, the US Trade Representative announced that the US will negotiate entry into the P4 agreement, tentatively starting in March 2009. In November 2008, the governments of Australia, Peru and Vietnam announced their inclusion as well, while the Chilean and US governments have lobbied the Korean government to also join. This raises the spectre of any "P4+" deal, now dubbed a Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement (TPP), evolving into a potentially APEC-wide, comprehensive free trade agreement, which the Obama administration confirmed [International Trade Daily, 5 March 2009]. Japan and the Philippines are also potential members of the TPP.

There have been mobilizations in several countries against the agreement, including in New Zealand, the US, and Japan, where, in the latter case, resistance to the agreement has been widespread, particularly among farmers. New Zealand campaigners have warned that the US proposal for the TPP’s intellectual property provisions go much further than the WTO TRIPs or the US-Korea FTA threatening Maori culture and traditional knowledge, regulations on genetic modification and access to affordable medicines.

Leaked drafts of the agreement are available here: http://www.bilaterals.org/spip.php?rubrique55.

last update: May 2012


    Links

  • AFTINET TPP campaign site
    Web page on the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement maintained by the Australian Fair Trade and Investment Network
  • Flush the TPP!
    Stop the global corporate coup!
  • Help free the TPP!
    The Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement—which some have come to refer to as "NAFTA on steroids"—could ultimately affect the lives of billions of people worldwide. Neither the public, the press, nor even the US Congress knows the full extent of what’s in the text being negotiated—but corporate lobbyists know what it contains. Help us raise a reward for WikiLeaks should it publish the negotiating text of the TPP!
  • It’s our future
    Website on the implications of the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement for New Zealand
  • Jane Kelsey’s TPP (US-P4+) website
    This site is intended to provide a primary resource for the negotiations of the TPP. It is maintained by Jane Kelsey, an activist and researcher in New Zealand.
  • Moana Nui 2011
    Pua Mohala I Ka Po in collaboration with the International Forum on Globalization presents an international conference on Pacific transitions: "Moana Nui: Pacific peoples, lands and economies", November 9-11, 2011 Honolulu, Hawaii
  • New Zealand Not For Sale Campaign
    An extended P4 Agreement with the US, if it becomes reality, will be a mini-MAI for New Zealand. It must be stopped, at all costs.
  • Occupy TPPA
    The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA) is a mega-treaty across nine or more countries. If the negotiations succeed they will put a straightjacket on the policies and laws our government can adopt for the next century. Corporations will gain massive new powers in Australia. Help us stop the TPPA!
  • Stop TPP Action
    Japanese alliance website
  • TPP Watch
    TPPWatch is a network of concerned unions, groups and individuals formed to organise and support initiatives to oppose the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA).
  • TPP: What you don’t know will hurt you
    Site run by Public Citizen in the US
  • TPPxBorder
    Cross-border network against the Trans-Pacific Partnership
  • Trans-Pacific Partnership Digest
    The website, supported by the University of Auckland, aims to provide an easily accessible and comprehensive database of resources for researchers, activists, officials and others to encourage informed debate and critical engagement with the issues arising from the proposed TPP agreement and to influence the negotiations.
  • US-NZ Council TPP page
    Section of the UN-New Zealand Council website dedicated to the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations